Coastguard Cutter

The Coastguard Cutter 2.20

-> Tony on April 25 2017
Q8. Fire at Kingstown. 1882
A fire which threatened to be of the most formidable and destructive character broke out shortly after 7 o’clock to night, in the carpenter’s workshop and dairy yard of Mr.Michael Brady, Cross ave.Hundreds of persons of all classes, sizes, and conditions were to be seen in hot haste towards the place where the flames arose. Crowd jostled crowd, and persons who lived in houses which were in danger of igniting, and those who lived in houses which they thought wold be burned, were frenzied with fear and indecision. All kinds of furniture were bundled into the street, horses in terror were dragged from their stables, when the police promptly came up . They lost not a moment in forcing back the crowd, while the flames for a time seemed to threaten the whole side of Cross Street with total destruction. The Coastguards, under the direction of their officer Mr.Mahoney, did effective and prompt service- that is, all the service they could offer in the absence of any appliance to bring the water, which was running idly at high pressure beneath their feet. An anxious half-hour elapsed,and no brigade; another half-hour passed and things were looking desperate. Then they heard “The man is coming”, which he was, but no brigade.Now they got the hose in connection with the Vartry water main with as little delay as possible.
Mr.Mahoney and his Coastguards and Captain M’cullagh, R.N. showed the way, and no sooner was the water at high pressure brought to bear on the flames then they went down before it and showed that had there existed a proper organisation for the extinction of fires in Kingstown an Industrious poor man would not have been ruined tonight, nor the furniture and residences of his neighbours sadly injured.
Reference; The Irish Times 4 February 1882.



Q77. AWARD
Royal National Lifeboat Institution, Lifesaving Medal. Silver

Awarded to WILLIAM ROE, Boatman, H.M. Coastguard,Minnard, County Kerry. Voted 24th.December 1828.
This medal was authorised in 1824, the first medals being presented in 1825.

On the night of 7th.-8th. December 1828, in stormy weather, the Belfast brig Veronica was driven ashore on the sands outside the Inch Bar in Dingle Bay, Co. Kerry, Ireland while on passage from Liverpool to Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A. The vessel soon became a total wreck and a crew and a passenger, mountainous seas breaking over them, were forced to take to the rigging. It was impossible for rescuers to get near her and after a short time the wreck was driven into deeper water, where it sank with her mainmast gone and only her foretop mast out of the water, with all the survivors clinging to it.The Coastguards four-oared gig was launched and got clear, but filled with water and had to be baled out. Still the crew of the gig managed to reach the Veronica and take on board the brig’s Master, Mate, 2nd Mate, Carpenter, 13
Seamen and the passenger. The gig was then paddled to the shore, a journey lasting some 2 1/2 hours, which ended with the gig being overturned and everybody having to be rescued from the surf. The brig Veronica, 329 tons, was built at Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in 1824, and was owned by Morland of Belfast. She ran a regular service between Liverpool and Charleston, South Carolina, returning to Liverpool with cargoes of cotton. The rescue of the crewmen and passenger resulted in the award of five silver lifesaving medals to boatmen from the Minnard Coastguard Station.



P81. Baldoyle Station.
On the 9th June 1883, the Right Honourable Richard Wogan Baron Talbot de Malahide granted a lease by indenture to the British Crown , of a tract of coastal land situated in the south of the townland of Robswalls and about midway between Nangle’s Martello Tower and Robswalls castle. The lease was effective for 90 years and under its term a Coastguard station was built on the land. The terms for the lease were very detailed and some of them were rather unusual. There was provision for a boat-slip and for an enclosed walled garden. One provision allowed for an ‘ amount of seaweed necessary to cultivate the garden’ to be taken annually from the foreshore.
The old Coastguard station was destroyed by fire on the eve of the signing of the Treaty and over the years the ruined building became reduced to a mass of rubble and disappeared for ever. There is no visible evidence of the building, but part of the garden wall is still standing. “Grainne Lodge” stands on the site now.
(Evelyn Loughran)
Reference; “The Velvet Strand” by Tadgh Kennedy.



P183. Wreck, ‘Margaret’ 1843.
Drogheda 21 st. February. Yesterday (Monday) the brig ‘Margaret’, Capt.Paton, bound from Ardrossan for Dublin, foundered about 20 miles East of Drogheda. Five of her crew were saved by getting into the long-boat, and cutting her adrift. There was a tremendous sea running at the time, and the Margaret in a few minutes disappeared, and with her Capt.Paton, and two apprentices. About 5 Hours after the vessel foundered, the boat containing the five survivors, was picked up by the men belonging to the Coastguard station at Clogher, and towed in there.
Reference; The Cork Examiner 27 February 1843.



P216. Wreck of the Lydia. 1860.
To the Editor of the Irish Time
Sir,- Having seen the report of the wreck of the ‘Lydia’ in your paper on Friday, I take the liberty of stating more accurately the facts as they really occurred.
The vessel anchored outside the Roosk Bank on Saturday night, when on Sunday , it is stated some boats reached her, and that their assistance was refused. This I entirely deny, as from the time we knew the dangerous position we were in until the vessel struck we anxiously looked for help that never appeared. It is also stated that the vessel was water-logged; this was not the fact. We struck at 3 p.m. on Monday, and from that time till daybreak next morning no lifeboat ever made its appearance, though I understand it was sent for the day previous. Had it not been for the rocket apparatus aided by the great exertions of the Coastguard and the country people, we should all have inevitably perished. Your correspondent stated that 18 lives were saved , whereas 19 was the number.
I am, sir, yours, obediently, Frederick D. Bltthman. (passenger per Lydia) Kilmuckridge Dec.3.1860
Reference; The Irish Times 6 December 1860. p.3.



P319. Galway Wreckers. 1880.
It appears from the evidence for the prosecution that the Neptune, 600 tons, laden with hay and butter, and trading between Galway and Glasgow, struck on a rock on the Galway coast, north of Spiddle, and, in order to save the cargo, the master ran her aground. Her position was rendered safe by two hasers, fastened to rocks off shore. On the morning after the craft was stranded a large number of peasantry gathered on the beach in hope of seeing her go to pieces. Next day they came in larger numbers, and a determined attack was made on the vessel. A number of Coastguards and 30 police were required to keep them at a safe distance but notwithstanding the efforts of this large force, one of the hawsers was cut – the Crown alleges by the act of the prisoner – and the safety of the vessel endangered.
Witnesses were examined for the defence, to prove that the arrested had not cut the rope. It was admitted by these people that the crowd had collected in the hope of seeing the Neptune break up. One of these men being asked by counsel was it a proper thing to cut the rope, replied “it was not, but that was a fashion they have in the country upon such occasions.”
The jury convicted the prisoner, and he was put back.
Reference; The Irish Times 15 December 1880.



P319. Galway Wreckers. 1880.
It appears from the evidence for the prosecution that the Neptune, 600 tons, laden with hay and butter, and trading between Galway and Glasgow, struck on a rock on the Galway coast, north of Spiddle, and, in order to save the cargo, the master ran her aground. Her position was rendered safe by two hawsers, fastened to rocks off shore. On the morning after the craft was stranded a large number of peasantry gathered on the beach in hope of seeing her go to pieces. Next day they came in larger numbers, and a determined attack was made on the vessel. A number of Coastguards and 30 police were required to keep them at a safe distance but notwithstanding the efforts of this large force, one of the hawsers was cut – the Crown alleges by the act of the prisoner – and the safety of the vessel endangered.
Witnesses were examined for the defence, to prove that the arrested had not cut the rope. It was admitted by these people that the crowd had collected in the hope of seeing the Neptune break up. One of these men being asked by counsel was it a proper thing to cut the rope, replied “it was not, but that was a fashion they have in the country upon such occasions.”
The jury convicted the prisoner, and he was put back.
Reference; The Irish Times 15 December 1880.



P321.Ballywalter disaster. 1877.

This morning about 6 o’clock a lamentable occurrence which resulted in the death of six men, took place at what is known as the Roddens near Ballyhalbert. A heavy rain and rough seas, about five a small craft said to be a Welsh craft laden with slates was in imminent danger of going on the rocks and making signals of distress.. John Bell, a newspaper proprietor yoked his car and proceeded to the coast, accompanied by a retired sea captain named Bailie, and with two of the Coastguards of the Roddens station put off to the rescue of the crew. The smack was reached in safety, and the crew of three men taken aboard the boat, which, when close to the shore, on its return was swamped by the breakers. No assistance could be rendered. Only one man survived. The smack sunk in a short time.
Reference; The Irish Times 14 April 1877.



P354.Narrow Escape from Drowning, Kingstown 1896
Courageous Act of a Coastguard. A little boy named Edward Oxford, aged 11 years, son of Commissioned Boatman Edward Oxford, Coastguard Station, Kingstown, had a narrow escape from drowning on Saturday afternoon. The child was plying with some other boys near the Coal quay at the Harbour, when he accidentally fell into the water. Coastguard Edmund Earwood, who was near the spot at the time, was informed of the accident, and without divesting himself of any clothing sprang into the sea. The child was about six yards away from the bank, and rapidly sinking, when Earwood with great difficulty, got hold of him as he was disappearing below the surface. A gentleman whose name has not transpired, took off his overcoat, and by this means Earwood and the rescued child were drawn out of the water . he boy was unconscious when brought on shore, but subsequently recovered on reaching his home. Great praise is due to Coastguard Earwood for his prompt and efficient service on the occasion, as the child would have been drowned were it not for his timely and courageous help.
Reference; The Irish Times 8 February 1896.



P354.Narrow Escape from Drowning, Kingstown 1896
Courageous Act of a Coastguard. A little boy named Edward Oxford, aged 11 years, son of Commissioned Boatman Edward Oxford, Coastguard Station, Kingstown, had a narrow escape from drowning on Saturday afternoon. The child was plying with some other boys near the Coal quay at the Harbour, when he accidentally fell into the water. Coastguard Edmund Earwood, who was near the spot at the time, was informed of the accident, and without divesting himself of any clothing sprang into the sea. The child was about six yards away from the bank, and rapidly sinking, when Earwood with great difficulty, got hold of him as he was disappearing below the surface. A gentleman whose name has not transpired, took off his overcoat, and by this means Earwood and the rescued child were drawn out of the water . he boy was unconscious when brought on shore, but subsequently recovered on reaching his home. Great praise is due to Coastguard Earwood for his prompt and efficient service on the occasion, as the child would have been drowned were it not for his timely and courageous help.
Reference; The Irish Times 8 February 1896.



P361. Waterford Murder Case. 1909.

An elderly man named George Tupper, Bonmahon, County Waterford, was charged with having on November 2nd murdered his son, aged about six years. Accused, who wept frequently in the dock, pleaded not guilty.
The evidence showed that the accused, who was an ex-Coastguard, lived at Bonmahon, County Waterford. On the 2nd November he came to the barracks, and said he wanted to see the sergeant. Sargeant Lee came out, and accused said, “Sergeant, I have killed my son” Prisoner was detained, and the police proceeded to his house. There they found in a bedroom a boy of about six years murdered. A knofe was discovered with blood. Prisoner had three children younger than this boy, and he was devoted to them all. Medical evidence showed that accused was insane when he committed the crime.
The jury found him guilty of murder, but that he was insane at the time of the commission of the crime.
He was ordered to be detained in a lunatic asylum during the will and pleasure of the Lord Lieutenant.
Reference; The Irish Times 13 December 1909.



P447. A Riot. 1860.
A riot was provoked in Queenstown on Sunday by some Coastguard volunteers, who had been spending their money in the public houses, but by the exertions of the local police it was soon suppressed. As usual on all such occasions, there was more a tumult than mischief; but on the Sabbath day the exhibition was truly disgraceful. – Cork Examiner.
Reference; The Irish Times 30 March 1860.

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