Coastguard Cutter

The Coastguard Cutter 2.23

-> Tony on November 12 2017
E158. Suicide of a Coastguard. Midleton, Sunday.
Last evening a Coastguard officer named Thomas Wuztzell, marrief, 46, was found dead in his bedroom at Ballycrovane Station near Midleton, with a revolver by his side. The coastguards at the station hearing several shots fired, proceeded to the deceased's room, and found him dying from hemorrhage with gunshot wounds in the throat. The deceased who was a native of Birmingham, was on duty all yesterday, but his demeanour appeared strange. Dr. Riorden, Cloyne, immediately attended, but the deceased died an hour after.
Reference; Daily Independent Monday 26th.March 1894



G117a . Shipwreck.
Another Melancholy shipwreck occurred the night of Friday Last 20th.inst. on the Island of Valentia when a brig, about 150 tons. burden, (two white streaks painted on her side and false ports, as well as could be collected from the fragments.) was driven ashore, and all on board unfortunately perished. Part of the cargo of pine, oak lumber and beech has been driven on shore, and is in charge of thr Coast Guard who have been actively employed under the direction of the Knight of Kerry.
Reference. Morning Register Sat 28 Dec. 1833



G161. Shipwreck.
The ‘Lune’ of Yarmouth, Silver, master, laden with barley was driven on shore on Shennick Island opposite Skerries on Thursday night last, and her crew lost- When four of the bodies were found Mr.W.Paisley, the Coast Officer of Balbriggan attended the inquest, and in consequence of his exertions a considerable share of property was saved, he also purchased four coffins, and had the bodies interred in Skerries Church-yard.
Reference: Saunders News Letter Friday 28th.January 1831



R10. Report
Wreck of the barque “Crisis” of Liverpool on the Eastern coast
Drogheda. 18th January 1862. A report by Captain Adderley Bernard of the Coastguard at Clogherhead on the wreck of the barque “Crisis” on the 17th. inst. A pinnance with 8 men came in at Clogherhead at about half past nine a.m.. She appeared to belong to the barque “Crisis” of Liverpool bound for Singapore with a general cargo and crew of 18 men.

Medal Lifesaving.
Andrew Bernard ( aka Atherley Bernard and Adderley Bernard) NGS. 1793-1840 Bar, Basque Roads 1809 Ord. HMS Indefatable. R.H.S. medal awarded 1814/1815.



H145.
Sir James Dombrain.
“Amongst those who walked the site of the line in August 1851 were Sir James Dombrain, and Mr. Le Fanu, the engineer in charge, the former being the first Chairman of the constituted company. Born in Canterbury,England, in 1793, he was for twenty years connected with the Coastguard service as Inspector General, and his association with the railway sponsors followed his retirement.”
“The first manager was Louis S.Demay, and on the board were the Hon. Hayes St.Leger, Edmund Powell, Henry Massey, Thomas Mackie; the acting secretary was W.Wood, and honorary secretary Edward Dombrain, the son of Sir James Dombrain, the chairman. On the 6 may 1855, the Waterford News announced the arrival at Tramore of Sir James and Lady Dombrain; bonfires blazed and the station was decorated.”
“Sir James remained chairman until 1866, and eventually died on 24 September 1871”
Reference; ‘The Waterford and Tramore Railway’ by The Late H.Fayle and A.T.Newman.



L52 Shipwreck 1826.
On the evening of the 6th.inst., the Swedish brig, ‘Emelie’, of Gifle, from Alicante to Belfast, 11 weeks out, was dismasted in a tremendous gale of wind, about a mile off the land at Ballyteague Bay, and soon drove on shore on the Burrow. She remained beating on the surf, which every moment made a clear breach over her, and her crew, eleven in number, appeared on deck, imploring by signs, assistance from the shore. Mr.Thompson of the Kilmore station, and Mr.Hore of the Bar Lough station, with the men under their command, assisted by some gentlemen
Were indefatigable in their well directed and spirited exertions to relieve the sufferers, whose lives each succeeding
wave was expected to terminate. They eventually succeeded in saving 9 out of the number, and towards midnight had them safe on shore. Their efforts were above all praise.
Reference; The Times 17 February 1826.



R25. Boating fatality on Lough Swilly.
Derry, Monday. A verdict of accidental drowning was today returned at the inquest on the bodies of coastguardsmen Richard Tibbles and William John Stowers, natives of Plymouth and Kent respectively, who were drowned in Lough Swilly about midnight on Saturday through the capsizing of a boat in which they were conveying to the training ship Calypas nine midshipmen who had attended a dance. It transpired that the midshipmen crowded into the stern against the boatmen’s advice.
Reference. Evening Herald 30th. August. 1892.



LX163. Shipwreck ‘Joseph and Dorothy’ 1828.
The ‘Joseph and Dorothy’, Morton, of Hull was lost in Inch Bay, near Ballycotton, on the 8th.inst. All aboard perished, nothing has been saved but the two masts and bowsprits. These articles have been placed in the possession of the Coastguards whose station is near the scene of destruction and the officer and men of the establishment have been unremitting in their endeavours to watch the shore for any property coming upon the beach.
Reference; Freemans Journal Tuesday 23 December 1828.



R40.Boat capsized at Clontarf.
Some excitement was caused at Clontarf yesterday by a boating incident in which two well known members of the local club, Messrs Dexter and Freeman, had a narrow escape from drowning. They were out sailing in the bay, and when about a mile from shore a squall struck the boat, which heeled over and rapidly filled. Before the two gentlemen could right the boat a second squall caused it to capsize. A rescue party was promptly organised, and went to their assistance. The upturned boat to which both men were clinging, was drifting out to sea, but in a short time it was reached by the rescuers, and the two men were taken on board in an exhausted condition. Meanwhile a party of coastguards from the Dollymount station launched a boat and soon reached the rescuers and rescued. The coastguards quickly conveyed the latter to the landing slip, where a crowd had assembled and they quickly recovered.
Reference; The Irish Times. 23rd. April 1905.



L52 Shipwreck 1826.
On the evening of the 6th.inst., the Swedish brig, ‘Emelie’, of Gifle, from Alicante to Belfast, 11 weeks out, was dismasted in a tremendous gale of wind, about a mile off the land at Ballyteague Bay, and soon drove on shore on the Burrow. She remained beating on the surf, which every moment made a clear breach over her, and her crew, eleven in number, appeared on deck, imploring by signs, assistance from the shore. Mr.Thompson of the Kilmore station, and Mr.Hore of the Bar Lough station, with the men under their command, assisted by some gentlemen
were indefatigable in their well directed and spirited exertions to relieve the sufferers, whose lives each succeeding
wave was expected to terminate. They eventually succeeded in saving 9 out of the number, and towards midnight had them safe on shore. Their efforts were above all praise.
Reference; The Times 17 February 1826.

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